FAQs

FAQ

Q?

Is Cuba Safe?

A.

Actually, Cuba has the lowest crime rate in the Western Hemisphere! They bend over backwards to make sure everyone has a safe and pleasant stay.

Q?

Can I fly to Cuba on my own?

A.

Many Americans are surprised to discover that they can fly directly to Cuba from the U.S. via a licensed charter flight. All flights from the U.S. to Cuba are regulated so you won’t find them available online or directly through an airline. However we are traveling under a license from the Department of Treasury and as such, can book a charter flight. We will be taking an American owned and operated flight for the short duration to Cuba.

Q?

What are the rules about Americans visiting Cuba?

A.

Travel to Cuba for Americans is still highly restricted by the U.S. Department of Treasury under the official embargo.

Q?

What’s a Jewish Mission look like?

A.

Click HERE to see a video which answers just that.

Q?

Should I bring goods to donate?

A.

Donations are a thoughtful gesture when visiting Cuba. Approximately one month prior to departure you will receive an itemized list of the most urgently needed items. Examples might include: antibiotics, diabetic and asthma medications, clothing, etc.

Q?

How do Cubans feel about Americans?

A.

The average Cuban on the street welcomes Americans with open arms. They are generally happy to engage in conversation and vendors are pleased to welcome you into their shops or restaurants. Many Cubans feel a kinship with Americans and enjoy talking about sports, culture, music or just about anything. Remember to be open minded and respectful of cultural differences

Q?

Will my US cell phone work in Cuba?

A.

Until recently, American cell plans have not offered service in or from Cuba. Currently, a few telecommunications companies have begun service; prior to travel, contact your cell provider. You may dial the US from your hotel room phone or purchase an international cell phone with a variety of calling plans.

Q?

Will my laptop/iPad work in Cuba?

A.

Most often you will be able to purchase Internet minutes from your hotel which you may use on your own laptop in your room, hotel lobby or in the business center, where computers are usually available as well. As with many things in Cuba, service may be slow.

Q?

What time zone is Cuba?

A.

Eastern time (same as New York or Miami)

Q?

What currency system is in Cuba and can I exchange money before I arrive?

A.

There are two monetary currency systems in Cuba. Most tourists will use the Cuban Convertible Peso (“CUC” known as cooks), which can only be exchanged once in Cuba. The exchange rate is standard, whether at a hotel or a bank. For USD basically $ 1 = .87 CUC Euros and Canadian Dollars will receive the current market exchange rate. This rate is normally yields a better exchange than US dollars.

It is never advisable to exchange with hustlers on the street who may offer you an exchange rate that is too good to be true….it invariably is!

If you end up with an excess of cooks before departure, you will get a fair exchange back into US dollars without paying a penalty.

Locals rely on the old Cuban Peso, which is sold at a much different exchange rate and allows locals to purchase food and goods at much lower, affordable rates.

Q?

Can I use an ATM in Cuba?

A.

Unfortunately, no.

Q?

Can I use my credit card in Cuba?

A.

Currently, credit cards drawn on a US bank are not accepted in Cuba. Knowing this, bring more money than you think you may need while traveling in Cuba.

Q?

What is the electrical current in Cuba?

A.

The electrical current in most offices and hotels is 220V, although there are facilities with 110V as well. The power outlets are thin, round pins, though most will accommodate US plugs. You may use adapters. converters are usually not needed in most Havana hotels.

Q?

Do I need immunizations before traveling to Cuba?

A.

None are required, though you may wish to ask your personal physician for any individual needs.

Q?

What are the restaurants like? Are they expensive?

A.

There are two main type of restaurants. The state run, which we will enjoy as a group, and the Paladare, privately owned, smaller restaurants often run in people’s homes (though you would never know!). The menu varies between paladares, and the quality can be superb. We will offer suggestions of some favorite paladares for you to experience on your own. A full dinner including appetizer, main course, dessert and wine generally runs about $35/pp in the finer paladares.

Q?

What type of clothing should I bring to Cuba?

A.

As the weather is generally quite warm to hot, plan to dress in layers, bringing a light sweater for evenings. Lightweight, cotton clothing is most practical, with comfortable walking shoes. A light rain jacket may come in handy. Dress is on the informal side.

Q?

Are there any travel restrictions?

A.

Due to United States restrictions, travel to Cuba continues to be extremely limited. You will be traveling under the Exclusive Expeditions’ religious and/or people-to-people license, which falls under OFAC’s regulations and is one of the legal ways for Americans to travel to Cuba.